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UNKNOWN FACTS ABOUT GUINNESS BOOK OF WORLD RECORDS!!!!

Guinness Book world ….This Book it self is World Record as it is matchless and the biggest selling copyright book in history, said to have been outsold only by the Bible, the Koran and Chairman Mao.

HOW GUINNESS BOOK EMERGED ?

The book’s story began at a shooting party in Ireland in 1951, when the managing director of Guinness Brewery, Sir Hugh Beaver, found himself in an argument about whether or not the golden plover was Europe’s fastest game bird.

Sir Hugh Beaver

On 10 November 1951, Sir Hugh Beaver, then the Managing director of the Guinness Breweries, went on a shooting party in the North Slob, by the River Slaney in County Wexford, Ireland. After missing a shot at a golden plover, he became involved in an argument over which was the fastest game bird in Europe, the golden plover or the red grouse .. it is the plover. That evening at Castle bridge House, he realized that it was impossible to confirm in reference books whether or not the golden plover was Europe’s fastest game bird. Beaver knew that there must be numerous other questions debated nightly in pubs throughout Ireland and abroad, but there was no book in the world with which to settle arguments about records. Then he realized then that a book supplying the answers to this sort of question might prove successful.

AUGUST 27TH 1955 ….

The Guinness Book of Records was first published on August 27th, 1955. In its fifty years the book has sold more than a hundred million copies, which makes it the biggest selling copyright book in history, said to have been outsold only by the Bible, the Koran and Chairman Mao.

The Guinness Book of Records was first published on August 27th, 1955.

MORE THAN HUNDRED MILLION COPIES !

In its fifty years the book has sold more than a hundred million copies, which makesAND 3.5 Million Copies a year !

23 LANGUAGES !

Now Guiness Book is in twenty-three languages in a hundred countries.

Meanwhile the world’s population has swelled from a mere 2.56 billion to 6.31 billion, but the latest edition points out that there are some records which still stand, even after fifty years.

SOME AMAZING WORLD RECORDS !

1) Irving Berlin’s White Christmas is still the world’s best-selling song.

2)The tallest man who ever lived is still an American named Robert Pershing Wadlow, who in 1940 was measured at 8ft 11.1 in.

3)The world’s largest office building is still the Pentagon, completed in 1943 with a total of 17.5 miles of corridors and 7,754 windows.

Fig : The construction of the Pentagon, the world’s largest office building. 1 July 1942.

4)The book combined meticulous accuracy with an enormously broad reach. It spread beyond sport, engineering, science and technology, the arts and entertainment to include wonderfully bizarre information, such as the largest kidney known to medical science, which weighed 13lb 4oz, or the name of the acrobat who performed a quadruple back somersault on to a chair at the New York Hippodrome in 1915. Readers were encouraged to set new records of their own, however ridiculous, like the largest ever simultaneous yodel (by 937 people in Germany in 2002) or the most spoons balanced at once on a human face (13 in 2004). All claims are solemnly checked and authenticated.

5)How much money do you get for a Guinness World Record?

It currently runs $800 USD for breaking an existing record (more if you are setting a new record). After your attempt, you can also purchase expedited evidence review for about $650 USD.

6)The international franchise has extended beyond print to include television series and museums. The popularity of the franchise has resulted in Guinness World Records becoming the primary international authority on the cataloguing and verification of a huge number of world records. The organisation employs official record adjudicators authorised to verify the authenticity of the setting and breaking of records.

7)After the founding of The Guinness Book of Records at 107 Fleet Street, London, the first 198-page edition was bound on 27 August 1955 and went to the top of the British best seller lists by Christmas. The following year, it launched in the US, and sold 70,000 copies. Since then, Guinness World Records has gone on to become a record breaker in its own right. With sales of more than 100 million copies in 100 different countries and 37 languages, Guinness World Records is the world’s best selling copyrighted book ever.  

8)Ross McWhirter was assassinated by the Provisional Irish Republican Army in 1975. Following Ross’ assassination, the feature in the show where questions about records posed by children were answered was called Norris on the Spot.

9)GUINNESS SUPERLATIVES

Guinness Superlatives, later Guinness World Records Limited, was formed in 1954 to publish the first book. Sterling Publishing owned the rights to the Guinness book in the US for decades. The group was owned by Guinness PLC and subsequently Diageo until 2001, when it was purchased by Gullane Entertainment for $65 million. Gullane was itself purchased by HIT Entertainment in 2002. In 2006, Apax Partners purchased HIT and subsequently sold Guinness World Records in early 2008 to the Jim Pattison Group, the parent company of Ripley Entertainment, which is licensed to operate Guinness World Records’ Attractions. With offices in New York City and Tokyo, Guinness World Records’ global headquarters remain in London, while its museum attractions are based at Ripley headquarters in Orlando, Florida, US.

10 )GUINNESS EVOLUTION

Recent editions have focused on record feats by person competitors. Competitions range from obvious ones such as Olympic weightlifting to the longest egg tossing distances, or for longest time spent playing Grand Theft Auto IV or the number of hot dogs that can be consumed in three minutes. Besides records about competitions, it contains such facts such as the heaviest tumour, the most poisonous fungus, the longest-running soap opera and the most valuable life-insurance policy, among others. Many records also relate to the youngest people to have achieved something, such as the youngest person to visit all nations of the world; it is Maurizio Giuliano.

11 )TEXTUAL TO ILLUSTRATIVE RECORDS

The retirement of Norris McWhirter from his consulting role in 1995 and the subsequent decision by Diageo Plc to sell The Guinness Book of Records brand have shifted the focus of the books from text-oriented to illustrated reference. A selection of records are curated for the book from the full archive but all existing Guinness World Records titles can be accessed by creating a login on the company’s website. Applications made by individuals for existing record categories are free of charge. There is an administration fee of $5 to propose a new record title.

A number of spin-off books and television series have also been produced.

Guinness World Records bestowed the record of “Person with the most records” on Ashrita Furman of Queens, NY, in April 2009; at that time, he held 100 records.

11 )9th NOVEMBER

In 2005, Guinness designated 9 November as International Guinness World Records Day to encourage breaking of world records. In 2006, an estimated 100,000 people participated in over 10 countries. Guinness reported 2,244 new records in 12 months, which was a 173% increase over the previous year. In February 2008, NBC aired The Top 100 Guinness World Records of All Time and Guinness World Records made the complete list available on their website.

For many records, Guinness World Records is the effective authority on the exact requirements for them and with whom records reside, the company providing adjudicators to events to determine the veracity of record attempts.

12 )A RECORD MAY BE REMOVED TOO…

The list of records which the Guinness World Records covers is not fixed, records may be added and also removed for various reasons. The public are invited to submit applications for records, which can be either the bettering of existing records or substantial achievements which could constitute a new record. The company also provides corporate services for companies to “harness the power of record-breaking to deliver tangible success for their businesses.”

GUINNESS ETHICS

Guinness World Records states several types of records it will not accept for ethical reasons, such as those related to the killing or harming of animals.

Several world records that were once included in the book have been removed for ethical reasons, including concerns for the well being of potential record breakers. For example, following publication of the “heaviest fish” record, many fish owners overfed their pets beyond the bounds of what was healthy, and therefore such entries were removed.

 The Guinness Book also dropped records within their “eating and drinking records” section of Human Achievements in 1991 over concerns that potential competitors could harm themselves and expose the publisher to potential litigation.

These changes included the removal of all spirit, wine and beer drinking records, along with other unusual records for consuming such unlikely things as bicycles and trees.

Other records, such as sword swallowing and rally driving (on public roads), were closed from further entry as the current holders had performed beyond what are considered safe human tolerance levels.

CLOSE …OPEN…

There have been instances of closed records being reopened. For example, the sword swallowing record was listed as closed in the 1990 Guinness Book of World Records, but the Guinness World Records Primetime TV show, which started in 1998, accepted three sword swallowing challenges, and so did the 2007 edition of the Guinness World Records onwards. Similarly, the speed beer drinking records which were dropped from the book in 1991, reappeared 17 years later in the 2008 edition, but were moved from the “Human Achievements” section of the older book to the “Modern Society” section of the newer edition.

As of 2011, it is required in the guidelines of all “large food” type records that the item be fully edible, and distributed to the public for consumption, to prevent food wastage.

Chain letters are also not allowed: “Guinness World Records does not accept any records relating to chain letters, sent by post or e-mail.”

DEFINITION DIFFICULTY

For some potential categories, Guinness World Records has declined to list some records that are too difficult or impossible to determine. For example, its website states: “We do not accept any claims for beauty as it is not objectively measurable.”

On 10 December 2010, Guinness World Records stopped its new “dreadlock” category after investigation of its first and only female title holder, Asha Mandela, determining it was impossible to judge this record accurately.

NO RECORD VERIFICATION !!! THIS ALSO A RECORD !

Guinness World Records website publishes selected records and is not supposed to be used for the record verification purposes, as it explains: “There are more than 40,000 current records in our database and we try our best to feature as many as possible online. We currently include over 15,000 records online which we update every week, so make sure to check the site regularly!” The book printed annually contains only 4,000 records. The only way to verify a record is to contact Guinness, and the average response time is 12 weeks.

GUINNESS GLAMOUR !!!

Traditionally, the company made a large amount of its revenue via book sales to interested readers, especially children. The rise of the Internet began to cut into book sales in the 2000s and forward, part of a general decline in the book industry. According to a 2017 story by Planet Money of NPR, Guinness began to realize that a lucrative new revenue source to replace falling book sales was the would-be record-holders themselves. While any person can theoretically send in a record to be verified for free, the process is slow and manual for this. Would-be record breakers that paid fees ranging from US$12,000 to US$500,000 would be given advisors, adjudicators, help in finding good records to break as well as suggestions for how to do it, prompt service, and so on. In particular, corporations and celebrities seeking a publicity stunt to launch a new product or draw attention to themselves began to hire Guinness World Records, paying them for finding a record to break or to create a new category just for them.

Guinness World Records was criticised by television talk show host John Oliver on the program Last Week Tonight with John Oliver in August 2019. While Oliver lightly mocked the corporate publicity side of Guinness’s revenue model, such as General Mills, Inc. being awarded a record for the construction of the world’s longest line of tacos, he pointed more serious criticism at Guinness taking money from authoritarian governments for pointless vanity projects. In particular, Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedow, the autocratic President of Turkmenistan, paid Guinness for a number of world records earned by the Government of Turkmenistan, and has bragged about the records set by Turkmenistan. Oliver mocked the resulting records such as the “Largest cycling awareness lesson” and “Highest density of white marble-clad buildings”.Oliver asked for Guinness to work with Last Week Tonight to adjudicate a record for largest marble cake featuring an embarrassing picture of Berdimuhamedow, but according to Oliver, the offer did not work out after Guinness insisted on a non-disparagement clause. Guinness World Records called the accusations false and stated that they declined Oliver’s offer to participate because “it was merely an opportunity to mock one of our record-holders.” As of 2019, the Guinness World Record for “Largest marble cake” remains with Betty Crocker Middle East, set in Saudi Arabia.

LOOK AT GUINNESS…IT PROVED THAT EVEN SMALL IDEA ITSELF CREATES A WORLD RECORD !!!!!

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